The Burnhams
Deepdale I Norton I Overy I Priory I St Henry I Sutton I Thorpe I Ulph I Westgate

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The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk

All Saints, Burnham Ulph
(Burnham Market)

Burnham Ulph: simple and pleasant

  All Saints, Burnham Ulph (Burnham Market)

Although Burnham Market is the largest of the Burnhams, it is not a historic parish, and in many ways it was an invention of the railway companies of the 19th century, who put one of their stations where three of the Burnhams had grown together - Burnhams Sutton, Ulph and Westgate. Sutton's church was lost in the 18th century, but those of Ulph and Westgate survived at either end of the green (Ulph's hidden from the green by houses). Curiously, 'Ulph' comes from the Old English word for a wolf. Perhaps it was the name of one of the local warlords.

All Saints, then, has become one of the two parish churches of Burnham Market, and is the simpler of the two - indeed, it is the least exciting of all the Burnham churches. But it is also rather sweet, being small and devotional, huddled between buildings in a wholly urban setting.

It is a towerless Norman church, extensively Victorianised with the replacement of virtually all the windows. Inside, Mortlock is right to call it 'simple and pleasant'. Its rustic feel quite belies the urban setting outside - again, essentially Victorian, but with a patina of age, and a gorgeous transitional chancel arch. Devotional statues, a brightly painted organ, and two rather impish corbel heads at the east end of the nave. A quiet space in the middle of a busy day.

Simon Knott, May 2005

 

looking east chancel arch sanctuary west end and font statue, organ 
grotesque (north) grotesque (south)

The Burnhams
Deepdale I Norton I Overy I Priory I St Henry I Sutton I Thorpe I Ulph I Westgate

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The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk