Acle Fishley Hoveton Ingham Neatishead
South Walsham St Lawrence South Walsham St Mary
Stalham Sutton Wroxham

home I index I introductions I e-mail I about this site

The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk

St Mary, Wroxham

Wroxham. Locked.

Read the captions by hovering over the images, and click on them to see them enlarged.
From the south Tom walks off in despair The doorway. Can you see the joins?

    St Mary, Wroxham

I expect you think I'm going to moan about Wroxham, and you are right. Despite the spectacular river I thought it was an unfortunate place, with impossible traffic grid-locked on the dirty A1151 which cleaves it in two, and the Roy's of Wroxham shopping empire dominating every view of the Hoveton side of the river. The church is right on the southern end of the strip, set back from the road in a housing estate. It was only six o'clock, but already it was locked.

The great feature of the exterior is the magnificent Norman south doorway; Pevsner describes it as 'barbaric and glorious', which is about right. Unfortunately, the parish in their wisdom have put two panelled outer doors on the porch, which they keep locked. You can see the doorway through the panels, but it is a bugger to photograph. I had to make a composite picture - see if you can spot the joins.

The church has one great treasure, a medieval alabaster relief of the Holy Family, presumably acquired from somewhere by an enthusiastic 19th century Rector. In any case, it is kept locked away in the vestry, so I wouldn't have seen it. The Victorians were also enlightened enough to employ the great William Wailes to do the windows here; but the parish destroyed one of his windows in the 1960s.

I wandered around the corner to look at Anthony Salvin's mausoleum to the Trafford family. I had wanted to photograph it, but at this end of a long day my batteries finally gave up the ghost. It was probably the effort of photographing that doorway through glass. Never mind - like Arnie, I'll be back. In the meantime, Peter Stephens has kindly supplied photographs of the inside, and of the Trafford mausoleum, which you can see below.

Simon Knott, September 2004

You can also read: an introduction to some Broadland churches I

looking east (c) Peter Stephens
looking east (c) Peter Stephens looking west (c) Peter Stephens font (c) Peter Stephens sanctuary (c) Peter Stephens modern Madonna and child (c) Peter Stephens
Salvin's Trafford mausoleum (c) Peter Stephens

   

You can also read: an introduction to some Broadland churches I

Acle Fishley Hoveton Ingham Neatishead
South Walsham St Lawrence South Walsham St Mary
Stalham Sutton Wroxham

Free Guestbook from Bravenet 

Amazon commission helps cover the running costs of this site.

home I index I latest I introductions I e-mail I about this site I glossary
links I small print I www.simonknott.co.uk I www.suffolkchurches.co.uk
ruined churches I desktop backgrounds I round tower churches

The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk