Breckles Lynford Merton Thompson Threxton

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The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk

All Saints, Threxton

All Saints, organically part of its surroundings

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    All Saints, Threxton

Having spent the morning touring the churches of the battle training area, it was strange to visit a church that wasn't surrounded by a twelve foot fence. It was also a relief to come to a churchyard that was so organically part of its surrounding area, adjacent to a farmyard and with cottages off to the north. Even better, it was open, and made a virtue of it. Having visited all 650 of Suffolk's Anglican and Catholic churches, past and present, during the previous four years, I had faced Norfolk with some trepidation, hearing reports of hosts of locked churches. I am happy to report that so far I have not found this to be true. Indeed, a sign in the porch here declared 'Welcome! This Church is Always Open!' Not on the 15th November 2001 it wasn't, some cynical wag had scrawled in biro underneath. Bah, humbug.

Before going in, I enjoyed the simplicity of the southern prospect, the windows all hovering around the late 13th century, the Norman tower bell openings echoing them. The north side is a bit more complex, the roof extending low to encompass a north aisle that is not apparent as a separate structure.

Stepping inside, you are immediately struck by the wall decorations. How they survived is interesting; at some point not long after the Reformation the aisle was partitioned off as a mausoleum, the arcade filled in and plastered over. When it was opened up in the 20th century the wall paintings were discovered, and preserved rather better than they would have been in the previous century. The arcade leans out charmingly, the font is pretty against a pillar, there is a collected scattering of medieval glass. Otherwise, all is late Victorian, but nonetheless charming; this is a super, pretty church, one to cock a snook at the purists, and to be enjoyed simply for being very lovely.

Simon Knott, July 2004

You can also read: an introduction to churches beyond the battle zone I

   

Looking east - charming The arcade, with its survivng wall paintings The font Glass in the north aisle
Wall painting - detail Medieval glass - detail Medieval glass - detail

an introduction to churches beyond the battle zone I

Breckles Lynford Merton Thompson Threxton

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The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk