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The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk

All Saints, Kettlestone

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  All Saints, Kettlestone

Kettlestone is an attractive village that merges into Little Snoring on the other side of the main road. All Saints is also attractive, and a touch quirky; the 14th century tower is octagonal all the way to the ground; is this a suggestion that the tower it replaced was round? There is what appears to be a door into the air about twenty feet off the ground, near the top of the stair turrett, which is attached to the nave. Was it once necessary to access the tower by an external ladder? The very top is obviously Victorian, and Mortlock suggests that the tower was actually lowered at this time.

All Saints, I am afraid, felt the full force of the middle-brow architect Frederick Preedy, who we have already met at Thornham and Burnham Westgate. He rebuilt this chancel in its entirety, and stepping into a fairly hum-drum Victorian interior we must assume that this is all his as well. There are some surviving medieval benches in the north aisle, but otherwise there is a quiet anonymity about it which may have been the very thing in the 1870s.

The font is good, a heraldic affair from the very eve of the Reformation, and Mortlock pointed out the tiny little organ - it is barely a metre and a half tall.

This church isn't terribly exciting, but it is open and welcoming, and as such an example to so many others.

Simon Knott, May 2005

 

  
  

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The Norfolk Churches Site: an occasional sideways glance at the churches of Norfolk